An Unplanned Lesson

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Join teacher writers and slice on Tuesdays.

Join teacher writers, and slice on Tuesdays.

In the classroom, sometimes I shift what I am doing when a student makes a comment or asks a question that leads to a teachable moment. When I take the time to recognize these moments, the unplanned lessons that follow are often powerful and beyond what I, as a teacher, could ever create.

In the “outdoor classroom” nature  becomes my teacher when I allow the unteachable moments to take hold in me. This week while hiking a nature trail at Carter’s Lake, I noticed an Einstein quote about nature  on an informational sign, “Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.”

On Nature

Einstein On Nature

 

Those words about nature moved me much more than     emc2    ever did.

 

After reading that sign, I decided to photograph images that would bring meaning to those words (so I could blog about something other than QR codes). Of course, what followed were more signs with words that moved me and more images to capture.  Perhaps the “sign” for me was in powerful quotes on the signs. As I sought to capture the meaning of the words in what was around me, I found myself looking deeper into nature, understanding everything better, and finding counsel in the trees. And all this happened because I embraced a teachable moment and let an unplanned lesson guide my day.

IMG_6831 IMG_6833

With all the words and images, I decided to share what I found when I looked deeper into nature through words and images in an Animoto video.

Here is my unplanned lesson from nature:

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5 thoughts on “An Unplanned Lesson

  1. This is wonderful. I love that beginning, “the trail awaits us”. I’m paying more attention this month, writing haiku every day helps me focus on what’s really important. I love the framing & the ‘pinned’ words. The bridge looks awesome!

    Like

  2. I miss so much in the rush to do. The analogy you make to those unexpected teachable moments in the classroom is perfect. That Animoto is so full. Each frame is worth studying and holding up.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. My juniors have been reading Wendell Berry’s “An Entrance to the Woods” this week–how neat to hear his beliefs about nature echoed across people, times and places. Sounds like you had a great hike!

    Like

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