Early Literacy Experiences in a Two Language Arts Teacher Family

Standard
We get figurative language at my house. Imagine two ela teachers with Michael and Sarah . My children’s similes are so creative, often not the tired, old ones I see on paper. I could fill the pages of the book with their words–too bad I can’t remember some of those creative similes right now. My son at an early age recognized sarcasm and would call his parents out on it. Lately, though, hyperbole is creating some family fun with words.
After School at Home with Michael, Age 8
My ela hubby said, “Michael, I’ve told you 1,000 times to pick up your socks.”
Michael hollered down the hall, “Hyperbole.”
Formative Assessment: Student can identify figurative language in various contexts and can distract parents with his witty comments.
Shopping with Sarah, Age 4
“Sarah, I guess we should finish up our shopping and go home. It’s past dinner time.”
“I’m so hungry I could eat a whole entire pig.”
“That’s hyperbole.”
“Hyperbole, what’s that?”
“It’s when we exaggerate. You couldn’t really eat a pig, could you?”
“Haha, no, but I’m really hungry.”
“What’s that word, girl?”
“Hy-hy-hyperbole.”
“You got it, Sar-bear. You are going to be soooo ready for your language arts classes in school.”
Formative Assessment: Student can use figurative language for desired effect.
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2 thoughts on “Early Literacy Experiences in a Two Language Arts Teacher Family

  1. Your post reminded me of a time, long ago, when my then 5th grade son QUOTED a "Lee Canter" teacher video tape to his teacher! Catching her off guard after she threatened to call home, he said, "You know, it works best when teachers try to get parents ON their side…"Now, he's found himself a nice little career-long "punishment" of sorts for driving HIS teachers crazy with teacherisms….now HE is a teacher too!

    Like

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